How To Guides

Merry Ginmas Sloe Negronis!

Thank you to all our members, followers and readers for everything this year. We are excited to join you for a spirited 2015!

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If you’re looking for something to drink this evening, its the perfect night for a sloe gin Negroni. Here’s how to make one… Or two… 😉

INGREDIENTS:
1 part London Dry gin
1 part sloe gin
1 part sweet vermouth
1 part Campari

TO SERVE:
Over crushed ice with a slice of clementine.

Combine the gin, Vermouth and Campari in a glass with ice and stir. Garnish with clementine.

Merry Ginmas everyone!

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Gin review, Naked Tasting

Gin tasting: Warner Edwards Victoria’s Rhubarb Gin

Price:                          ±£38

Profile:                        Rhubarb, citrus, crème brulee

Perfect serve:             Frozen, over ice as a sipping gin or a gin rickey

Our rating:                  8/10

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Gin fit for a Queen. No, really. This byoot-ee-fool gin is a Limited Edition from the chaps at Warner Edwards and it will really make you put your pinky up when sipping such a delightful drop. It’s made with rhubarb descended from a crop that grew in Queen Victoria’s garden – a most regal rhubarb that not only gives it a glorious flavour profile that’s both sweet and tart at the same time, but it colours the gin an elegant pink! And I, Lady Jenever, do heartily declare that this is one of my favourite gins of 2014.

I had seen Warner Edwards gin about, as one does, but had not got round to trying it until we met Sion Edwards and Tom Warner at Taste of London Christmas this year on a Gin Club mini-meet. The guys are such fun, a delight to chat to and I imagine the kind of chaps who would just make a dinner party with witty banter and good humour. Chatting a little more to Tom, he offered us a taste of Victoria’s Rhubarb and we had to buy a couple of bottles immediately for the rest of the Gin Club to taste.

Everything about this gin is delightful, from the story of how they came to become gin distillers (they met at agricultural college and started out with the intention of making essential oils..!) to the story of the rhubarb to the story of their still (it’s called ‘Curiosity’ thanks to the Distillery cat). It’s all delightful. The good folk at Gin Foundry wrote an awesome blog post about the Warner Edwards story – we won’t try and write one better, do have a read.

But to the gin itself… it’s a surprising gin to the palette, yet heart warming. We can thoroughly recommend getting your hands on a bottle before it’s all gone.

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#1:      ON THE NOSE

This is a summer Saturday afternoon with good friends in a glass – English rose, crème brulee, baked rhubarb and apple pie and a hint of lavender.

#2:      ON THE PALETTE

 A big hit of rhubarb (as you’d expect), soft citrus, pecans and caramel. This could easily be a sipping gin served ice cold.

#3       THE FINISH

Dry & warm but syrupy.

The Perfect Serve

We tried it straight up and of course as a classic G&T (Fever Tree tonic) with a slice of fresh lemon.

This would make a great gift for Christmas – if you’re looking for a last minute gift, get to your local gin retailer ASAP and bag a bottle, or do an IOU and buy from Warner Edwards direct.

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How To Guides

How to: Let it SLOE, let it SLOE, let it SLOE!

So, back in October I wrote a post on how to make sloe gin. And, with less than 10 days to go until Christmas day, tonight was the night to filter & bottle the good stuff! Here’s a quick guide to getting your sloe gin out of the KILNER and ready to gift.

What you’ll need…

  1. I have used 250ml KILNER clip top bottles. You’ll need as many as you have made gin for!
  2. Muslin. I use butter muslin from Kitchen Craft. You probably only need one pack.
  3. Conical sieve. I like the Kitchen Craft 16cm conical sieve for this.
  4. Stainless steel funnel. I use this one, again from Kitchen Craft. It has a small filter you can remove.
  5. Labels. I used chalkboard labels this year. You could buy some like these ones from NotOnTheHighStreet.com

Let's get these sloes on the road

So. First things first. You need to remove the sloe’s. Simples! Just pour your gin out of the jar through a large sieve or colander and throw your sloes away.

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Next, you want to line your conical sieve with a few layers of muslin. This will help to filter away some of the sediment. Note: it will never get rid of all of the sediment, but that’s OK. This is homemade sloe gin and a little sediment never hurt anyone. We aren’t talking professional chill filtration here, clearly. Do fold the muslin over a few times though before you line the sieve – the more times, the better the filter. Pour the gin through the muslin and sieve slowly (or is that sloe-ly?). Under the sieve, make sure you have another pyrex pouring jug or similar.

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Now that you’ve filtered your gin, you may wish to go again for a second filtration. Up to you.

Finally, you’re ready to decant into your bottles using a funnel.

Get those bottles labelled and you’re away! You could add some festive ribbon or decorations if you liked.

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Word of caution: I use these clip top KILNER’s because I like them and they are easy for the recipient to reuse, but they can leak (even though they aren’t meant to). Recommend wrapping and keeping the bottles upright under the tree!

So from everyone at The Gin Club and from myself, Lady Jenever, here’s wishing you the most wonderful Christmas and a Happy New Year!

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How To Guides, Uncategorized

How to: Making cocktails with Jam Jar Gin

We need to tell you more about a bloody marvellous gin –Yerburgh’s JAM JAR GIN. It hasn’t even come on the market yet, but we were lucky enough to try Botanical No. 1 last weekend. Read our earlier post from the naked gin tasting here.

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The whole philosophy behind Jam Jar Gin is one of experimentation. Borne out of experiments made in their home using ingredients found in their Victorian kitchen garden like raspberry leaves, Founders Dan & Faye Thwaites positively encourage you to try something different whether you are a mixologist or not – it makes for a welcomed attitude in the world of craft gins.

So what does Botanical No. 1 taste like? Well, call us crazy… but you know that first day of Spring in London? The one where you step outside and it just SMELLS different? If you could bottle that, it would taste like this gin! All Magnolia breeze, fresh fruits and cut grass… delicious! So we thought we’d try something full of fresh flavour, but the rules were to only use ingredients we had in the fridge and cupboard. We made two cocktails and we served them, appropriately, in jam jars!

Jam Fine

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You’ll need…

  • 5cl serve of Jam Jar Gin Botanical No. 1
  • 2-3 handfuls of frozen raspberries
  • Teaspoon of seedless bramble jam
  • 50ml Sugar water
  • Handful fresh mint leaves
  • 1 lime
  • A few drops of rosewater
  • Sprinkle of sherbet

How to make it….

  1. Boil the kettle and pour 50ml over some fresh mint leaves. Leave to steep for 3 minutes & then strain.
  2. Add 3 heaped spoons of sugar to the mint water and stir until dissolved. Place in the fridge to cool for 30 minutes.
  3. Place the frozen raspberries, a few drops of rose water, juice of half a lime and the cold mint sugar water in a blender. Or wait a few minutes (the berries will soon thaw) and crush them in a shaker. Muddle well.
  4. Place the teaspoon of bramble jam on the bottom of the jar and roughly spread. Pour your serve of gin over the jam and stir well.
  5. Spoon the frozen berry mixture into the jam jar right to the brim, lightly stir.
  6. Add a few blueberries to decorate, a fresh slice of lime and fresh mint. Sprinkle a few pinches of sherbet on the top.

Earl-y MarmeJamJam

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You’ll need…

The cocktail

  • 5cl serve of Jam Jar Gin Botanical No. 1
  • 1 tablespoon of marmalade
  • 100ml of cold steeped Earl Grey tea
  • 50ml Sugar water
  • 1 clementine

Garnish

  • 1 dehydrated clementine slice
  • Ice shards
  • Candied orange peel (shop bought is fine and is what we had in the cupboard)

How to make it….

  1. Pour 100ml cold water over some loose Earl Grey and allow to steep for an hour (cold steeping stops the liquid turning cloudy and produces a less bitter flavour – the truth is, it will go cloudy when you add the marmalade and the clementine juice, but the flavour is better)
  2. Hand squeeze and strain one clementine – this won’t produce a lot of juice, that’s ok. You just want the flavour. Mix with sugar water and the marmalade and stir till the marmalade dissolves. If you’re using a rough cut marmalade, strain once more. Place this mixture in the fridge or freezer so it get’s really cold!
  3. Once your tea is steeped, mix with the liquid you have had chilling in the freezer and your Jam Jar Botanical No. 1 gin – stir thoroughly.
  4. Pour into jam jar and garnish with a candied orange peel or dehydrated clementine slice and an ice shard.

And there you have it! Two delicious cocktails! We really encourage you to pop over and support the good folks at Jam Jar Gin on their crowd-finding page – help us get them on our shelves as soon as possible!

Tweet us if you give the cocktails a go too!

 

 

 

 

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